The Sex Talk: What You Should Tell Your Teens About Sex

Categories Youth's Advocacy and Ideas

The 2019 Digital Health Event discussed how emerging technologies and approaches could improve health. With these continuous advances, almost every information is within our reach, and our children’s. What we don’t want to explain to them, they can find unfiltered online. And one of those things we don’t want to talk about is sex.

But, the truth is that most teens wanted to get the sex talk from their parents, not from the web or their friends. If you don’t know where to start, here are some topics that you should include in the sex talk.

Body And Puberty

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Start talking to them about their bodies at an early age, and use the correct names for their private parts when you start the talk. Explain to them what happens during puberty and how it is different for girls and boys, and from child to child. You may use anecdotes to help them better understand the changes their bodies will undergo.

Gender

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Explain to your teens how gender is different from sex. And if they say that they don’t feel like the sex assigned to them at birth, then acknowledge and talk about it. What’s important is that you make your child loved and accepted, regardless of their gender identity.

Relationships

Your teen will most likely develop a romantic interest or relationship with another person when they hit puberty. That is why the best time to talk about sex is before that, as they will be less likely to act defensive about being in one when they’re younger. Also, never assume that your teen is only interested in having a relationship with the opposite sex. Talk about both heterosexual and same-sex relationships with them.

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Intercourse, STD, And Pregnancy

When you start talking about sexual intercourse with them, talk about consent, and safe sex. Then, talk about the effects of unprotected sex – pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. Your teen will be unlikely to tell you when they do try to have sex. That is why you should have a conversation about sex with them before they even do so.

Start early is the best tip for all parents when giving the sex talk. Your teens will listen; they’re just waiting for you to be ready to discuss it with them.

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